About

About | The Weaving Loom

About The Weaving Loom

Back when I was interested in weaving, there were many different resources to find out how to do the basics, but at the time there wasn’t any one place to go to. I searched for resources and taught myself how to weave through those resources and also through my own trial and error. As I gained experience weaving, I still would see brand new beginners asking about where to find out how to do different techniques, so I decided to create The Weaving Loom. I’m so happy I did too, because I really enjoy sharing what I’ve have learned, including the ways I’ve done things wrong. My goal for this website is to have a point of access for beginner weavers and also those looking to expand on what they already know, by trying something new.

I’m on my own weaving journey, so I definitely don’t have all the answers, but I love to share what I do know. I also want to encourage you to experiment and learn through many different outlets. There are many books to learn from and if you have the ability to attend a weaving class, then definitely do so. There is much more then one way to do things, so it is very valuable to learn from many different people.

I’m also more then happy to answer questions people have that they may be struggling with. If you have an issue send me an email at kate@theweavingloom.com and if possible, I will help!

About | The Weaving LoomPhotograph by Deanne Mroz Photography

About Me

My name is Kate, I live just outside of Chicago with my husband, two sons, and my silly french bulldog, Lou. Follow along with my weaving day-to-day here.

Some things about me:

  • I’m a long time lover of fiber arts and have dabbled in knitting, crochet, embroidery, but fell hard for weaving
  • I LOVE books and often I’m reading or listening to audiobooks (I’m always looking for good book recommendations)
  • I have a bachelor’s degree in Computer Information Systems and a master’s degree in Finance
  • I put my career on hold to stay home with my two young boys
  • Both of my boys were talking at a younger age and I’m pretty sure it’s because I talk to myself… a lot
  • I’m a secret cat lady. It’s a secret because I haven’t own a cat in about 6 years and it’s not looking like I’ll get one anytime soon. Seriously, I had cat posters all over my bedroom as a tween, and I may or may not have worn shirts with cats on them to school.
  • I’m a sock person, as in I don’t like walking around barefoot. Is that weird? Never mind, don’t tell me
  • I often make up little nonsense song ditties, that I sing out loud around the house
  • I’m a morning person, I used to wake up before my alarm everyday until I had kids, which is coincidentally when I started drinking coffee
  • I love helping people and solving problems, which if you have sent me an email with a question already, then you know 😉About | The Weaving Loom

I’m extremely thankful for all the lovely and talented people I have met through this blog and social media. Thank you for stopping over at my blog, you’re the reason I put all this time and effort into The Weaving Loom and I really hope you enjoy it!

Happy Weaving!

Kate

78 Comments

  • Reply
    joanne chan
    December 23, 2015 at 2:39 pm

    love your blog! i’ve just started weaving and will be referring to your site often for tips and guidance 🙂

    • Reply
      Kate
      December 23, 2015 at 3:01 pm

      Thank you so much Joanne! I hope you enjoy weaving!

      • Reply
        Nicki Turman
        January 11, 2017 at 9:22 pm

        I don’t know how to post to the blog, so I will try I reply. How can I post a picture of my finished project? I used my dad’s ties and made a wall hanging. It was my first weave and turned out great! Mom will love it. Thanks for all your tips, you helped me enter the world of weaving.

        • Reply
          Kate
          January 14, 2017 at 10:19 am

          That sounds that a really fun weave! You’re right you wouldn’t be able to post the picture here, but if you want to show me the picture you could always email it to me at kate@theweavingloom.com

    • Reply
      Julia
      May 20, 2017 at 2:57 pm

      Just found this blog and love it, am brand new to weaving but finding it sooo therapeutic and an easy creative outlet in amongst the chaos of kids, thank you so much for taking the time to put it together!

      • Reply
        Kate
        May 23, 2017 at 10:39 am

        Thank you so much for your kind words, I’m so happy that you’re finding the blog to be helpful and are enjoying weaving!

  • Reply
    Erin Lauray
    February 4, 2016 at 10:11 pm

    Thank you for this resource! I just started weaving as well and have found your site to be EXTREMELY helpful! 🙂

    • Reply
      Kate
      February 5, 2016 at 9:49 am

      Hi Erin! You are very welcome and I’m so happy you’re finding my site helpful 🙂

  • Reply
    Reut
    March 29, 2016 at 12:58 pm

    Your blog is everything I’ve been searching for and so much more!
    I’m so excited to dig in and start reading all your wonderful posts …
    Thank you so much!
    Reut

    • Reply
      Kate
      March 29, 2016 at 4:20 pm

      Hi Reut, thank you for your kind words 🙂

  • Reply
    judy leffler
    April 18, 2016 at 4:03 pm

    I am so glad you have made this blog! You have no idea how often I am referring back to it. I have even made a folder in my mail to keep all the emails you send out. Just wanted to let you know this blog is so awesome and keep up the great work! Thanks!

    • Reply
      Kate
      April 18, 2016 at 9:11 pm

      Thanks Judy, that is so nice of you to say 😀

  • Reply
    Sharnee Torrents
    April 29, 2016 at 5:25 am

    LOVE this blog and all the amazing tips and helpful information you sooo happily share!! 🙂 Thank you HEAPS!! What a blessing to have you go through things step by step!! I only hope to make beautiful things on my (very new) weaving journey like you have Kate 🙂
    YAY for sharing and YAY for the Weaving Loom!!
    Smiles Sharnee 🙂
    p.s Oh my your little logo is TOTALLY FABULOUS!

    • Reply
      Kate
      April 29, 2016 at 3:36 pm

      Thanks Sharnee, you’re too kind!! I’m sure you will make very beautiful weaves 🙂

  • Reply
    leslie renee crockett
    May 22, 2016 at 5:58 pm

    Hello. I wandered into this site while looking up for historical information on old knitting frames and am very pleased. I’ve been interested in fiber arts; especially weaving; from earliest childhood. My education is in bio and psy but I am self taught in sewing, knitting, embroidery, twining. Salish weaving etc. I’ve made several trys at fine weaving with mixed results. I think I expect too much from myself. I’m Aspergers and have spatial difficulties but I’ve gotten good at some of this stuff through sheer persistence. (read ‘ bull headed) Three of my four adult kids are talented artists, as was my mom. Thank you for sharing your knowledge.

    • Reply
      Kate
      May 23, 2016 at 3:44 pm

      Hi! Thanks for reaching out, it sounds like you’ve done a lot of different fiber arts and I’m very happy if my site will help you get more into weaving 🙂

  • Reply
    laurel
    June 18, 2016 at 1:07 am

    Thank you so much for creating such a helpful site!! I have been frustrated recently because all of the weavers I follow charge lots of money for classes and info books that I just couldn’t pay for. I’m so grateful for a place where I can widen my skills without spending all my money, thank you thank you thank you!!!

    • Reply
      Kate
      June 19, 2016 at 8:53 pm

      I understand, I try my best to share weaving and make it available to as many people as possible. But those charging money for classes and books is due to the fact that it takes a lot of time and work to arrange all that so please don’t feel that they have bad intentions. There are a lot of talented people offering classes and taking a class in person can teach a lot more then I can in pictures and words, so I do feel it is worth it for those who can afford it. But I’m more then happy to help people who want to learn how to weave get started 🙂

  • Reply
    Brooke
    June 18, 2016 at 5:09 am

    Hi Kate,
    I’m just trying to teach myself the herringbone technique but the link to your step by step process isn’t working 🙁 any chance you could help me with this? Thanks
    Brooke

  • Reply
    Marcia
    June 18, 2016 at 8:11 am

    Hi Kate, I too enjoy your site and use it often to figure out something or to try something new. I do have a question for you. I’m obsessed with weaving and think it’s the right craft for me at this point in my life but I don’t know what to do with my weavings once I’m done. I’ve made gifts for friends and I’ve hung them in my house – my poor husband never knows what he’s going to find on which wall. I’m not interested in selling but would like to do something with my pieces – at least the ones I’m proud of – without getting a divorce. Any ideas?

    • Reply
      Kate
      June 19, 2016 at 8:43 pm

      That is a hard question. Maybe you could ask a local coffee shop or small retail shop, something like that, if they would like to display your weaves as decoration? They might be very willing to hang free art on their walls. I also have been to a few hair salons that have art on the walls, so a place like that might also work? And if it’s a place you go to, then you could easily see your pieces as much as you want 🙂

      • Reply
        Jean Jones
        September 25, 2016 at 5:38 am

        I’m just “putting my toes in weaving waters”, but I’ve been a cross stitcher for over 45 years now. I’ve actually “Master” status over in Europe, just because I’ve a few stitchy friends who have down others, etc etc etc lol!!
        However, I thought I’d put my 2¢ worth in re: donating/doing something with your work. Years ago, I’d stitched a beautiful piece done in Sienna (browns, tans, ecru, white) of a mother holding infant. I finished and framed TWO days before birth of only daughter.
        For 25 years, it held a special place on my living room wall. One day, I overheard my mother taking about a place “Lily’s Place”. It’s coming to life was a very hard road, they wanted to try community support more than federal grant money, loans, etc.
        Lily’s Place is a FREE place for drug addicted moms who have given birth to drug addict infants (in this area of West Virginia that pretty much means heroin addiction).
        After two hard years, it began to pick up steam. One day, I was cleaning (a much more difficult and lengthy job due to extent of my physical disabilities) and dusting the 20-odd framed stitched pieces in my living room and a light popped on.
        I took down the “Mother & Child” piece and took it over to my mom’s and asked her to please take it to Lily’s Place and give it to them. Her jaw dropped because it is such a beautiful piece. She asked me if I was positive and I told her yes, but with one caveat: I wished to remain anonymous.
        A few months down the road, I went in with my mom to visit her (director of the place) and as I crossed the threshold, I almost started crying.
        There hanging on a wall with beautiful sconces on each side and a spotlight aimed at it (thank heaven for non glare glass) was the piece I’d donated! Below was an engraved plaque stating the story of how it came to be there and a multitude of appreciation for the “anonymous donor”.
        I received more pleasure in anonymous than when I donate “visually”. Just a little something too think about while you’re tossing around ideas for donating!

        • Reply
          Kate
          September 25, 2016 at 4:04 pm

          Thanks for sharing. That’s a beautiful story and a great idea.

  • Reply
    Marcia
    June 20, 2016 at 6:14 pm

    Thanks!

  • Reply
    Charlotte Rains Dixon
    July 8, 2016 at 11:12 am

    I’m a lifelong knitter but new to weaving–awaiting the arrival of my first loom, which I’ve ordered from Etsy. Your blog is amazing and so full of helpful information. I’ve been blogging about writing for 10 years so I know what effort it takes to accomplish this. Thanks so much.

    • Reply
      Kate
      July 8, 2016 at 2:51 pm

      Fun! I hope you really love weaving. I did a quick skim of your blog and it looks really interesting, I’ll have to check it out in more depth later. Have a great day!

  • Reply
    Jennidee Mills
    July 24, 2016 at 3:04 am

    Hi Kate, i discovered your blog a few days ago and jumped right in. I am having some trouble getting my woven creations OFF the looms. I want to removed them from the looms to sew together into larger creations. Can you do a tutorial on how to neatly weave in warp threads and how to stop the circle from curling or buckling once removed? Thanks so much ….Jenni

  • Reply
    Jennidee Mills
    July 24, 2016 at 3:06 am

    Oh Kate, i forgot to mention in my last comment that I’m doing CIRCULAR weaving on cardboard looms and on hoops. So i’m interested to know how to remove the circles and weave in the warps.

  • Reply
    Lisa
    July 27, 2016 at 5:09 am

    Hi Kate,
    I’m a Textiles teacher from Norwich and looking forward to sharing some of your work with the students after the holidays. They will be starting a new constructed textiles unit, can you recommend any current exhibitions that may support them in their study? Fantastic tutorials and resources!!!
    Many thanks,
    Lisa

    • Reply
      Kate
      July 28, 2016 at 4:34 pm

      Hi Lisa,
      Thank you so much for your kind words. I’m not sure of current exhibitions in your area, but there are more and more textile shows popping up, so I hope you can find one.

  • Reply
    Grace
    August 9, 2016 at 2:45 am

    Thank you so much the thought and time that you put into this blog. Your instructions have transformed weaving from a source of frustration into therapy!
    I’m still having issues with the edges of my weaves, though. After sufficient practice I am no longer pulling my weft threads too tight and changing the shape of the weaving. However, keeping the weft nice and loose means I’m having a hard time making nice straight lines up the edges of my weaving. Do you have any tips on keeping the outer edges uniform while still avoiding pulling the weft threads too tight? Does that make sense? I can send a picture to clarify if needed.

    • Reply
      Kate
      August 10, 2016 at 10:29 am

      Thank you for your kind words! I often get asked about the outer edges and I don’t have a really good solution (but I hope to figure one out!). It’s really good that you figured out how to keep the warp threads from pulling in, that is most people’s issue. I have read about people folding the edge back, ironing it and then sewing it to the back of the weave to get a nice finished edge. I haven’t tried this myself, and I think it’s mostly done on large tapestries, but that is something to consider if you really want a nice edge. I hope this helps!

  • Reply
    Era
    October 2, 2016 at 8:36 pm

    I’m so thankful for this blog! I’m just starting my weaving journey and it’s been invaluable.
    One question I haven’t been able to find the answer too though is, is it possible to make weaves with gaps in them?
    ie. to not add a weft/cover a warp on parts of the weave?

    • Reply
      Kate
      October 4, 2016 at 7:24 am

      Yes it is possible to make gaps on purpose and have exposed warp pieces. It might get tricker if the exposed warp area is large, like you might have to secure the top weft in some way, but definitely play around with it 🙂

  • Reply
    Robin
    October 13, 2016 at 3:29 pm

    So glad I joined your site. I have just begun my weaving journey. I’m dabbling in weaving and crochet. I’m originally from Chicago as well.

    • Reply
      Kate
      October 16, 2016 at 1:21 pm

      Very cool! I hope you love weaving, it can be addictive 🙂

  • Reply
    Dagny Carolina Opsal
    November 4, 2016 at 10:54 am

    Thanks for all the good advice! Learnt a lot!

    • Reply
      Kate
      November 10, 2016 at 3:21 pm

      Great! I’m happy to help 🙂

  • Reply
    Neve Ally Johnson
    November 22, 2016 at 1:18 am

    Hi Kate,
    Thanks for creating this website. I know how to knit and crochet and have been contemplating starting weaving, so I thought I would just find out how to make a little cardboard loom which led me to your site. Everything is very helpful.

    • Reply
      Kate
      November 22, 2016 at 4:37 pm

      Oh good, I’m happy to hear that 🙂

  • Reply
    Kezia
    December 1, 2016 at 5:30 am

    Hey! I did my first attempt of weaving last night (I have loads of other work to do for a craft fair this Sunday but I needed to get the first one out of my system) You have been so helpful! Definitely going to carry on and maybe incorporate my embroideries and weaving together! Thanks for the help!

    • Reply
      Kate
      December 4, 2016 at 10:41 pm

      Fun! I’m so happy I could help 🙂

  • Reply
    Lisa B Juarez
    December 29, 2016 at 11:04 am

    I just discovered your site through Etsy. I love it and have always had a secret love of weaving since I did a huge circular in high school about 45 years ago. Haven’t done anything since, but am now excited to start up again. I do gourd art and would love to incorporate into my gourds some of the weaving techniques you teach.

    • Reply
      Kate
      December 30, 2016 at 4:52 pm

      That sounds really fun! I’m happy to have gotten you back into weaving 🙂

  • Reply
    Allyson D
    December 30, 2016 at 8:53 am

    Hi Kate! This is kind of random, but I’m wondering if you’ve explored any three dimensional weaving? I’ve been seeing images of gorgeous tapestries that have thick trunk like woven sections on them – they don’t seem to be stitched on afterward, but I can’t really tell from the photos… I can’t figure it out!! They almost look like vertical double half hitch macrame knots amidst the weaving…

    Anyway… your blog is such a great resource, I’m not sure where else I can just throw the question out and ask! I don’t have a community of weavers to help out 😉 Let me know if you have any input on this or any idea where I can look further. I can’t seem to find instruction anywhere! Thanks!

    • Reply
      Allyson D
      December 30, 2016 at 8:56 am

      P.S. I’m in Charleston, SC – but I first learned to weave at College of DuPage back in the ’90s! I just now returned to it, having played with other textile arts on and off over the years, but I have always missed those giant looms. Stay warm and Happy Holidays!

    • Reply
      Kate
      December 30, 2016 at 4:54 pm

      That sounds really interesting, but I’m having trouble picturing exactly what you’re talking about. Do you have a link to any images?

  • Reply
    Laurie
    January 7, 2017 at 1:10 pm

    I”m so happy to have found your website. I took a weaving class in August and fell in love. I then bought a book and have made several projects from there, but have been looking for ways to expand my skills even more. I’m getting ready to start on a very simple weaving to give as a gift and was trying to figure out how to add some interest to the piece since it’s such a simple design….that’s when I found your tutorials for the various patterns. I’m going to give the double diamond a whirl, so I’ll let you know how it turns out!

    • Reply
      Kate
      January 10, 2017 at 1:27 pm

      That’s great! Yes please let me know how the double diamond turns out for you. But just to warn you, be patient with the process, it’s a tough one but if you keep at it, you’ll get a pattern in the end (I say this from my own experience with the pattern, lol).

  • Reply
    Luisa
    January 29, 2017 at 12:32 pm

    Hi Kate!
    I made a circular loom with a piece of cardboard. My first project with the loom went wrong. When I took the weaving out of the loom, instead of looking circular and flat it became sort of like a bowl. I made another attempt – a smaller one this time – and it looks the same. My guess is there’s too much tension, but since they’re my first two projects I couldn’t say for sure. Do you have any ideas about this or suggestions?

    • Reply
      Kate
      January 31, 2017 at 2:50 pm

      Thanks for reaching out. Yes I would say you have too much tension in your weft towards the outer parts of the circle, so the yarn is pulling in on itself and giving you a bowl shape. Try to weave more loosely with your weft threads and see if that helps at all. But to be honest, weaving bowls sounds pretty great to me!

  • Reply
    Moriyah
    March 4, 2017 at 2:28 am

    Hi there Kate, thank you so much for the time and energy that you put into all our posts! I love your blog and refer to it so many times. I just finished my third wall weave and finished off with the hem stitch and I love it because it really does give it a nice finished look. I was wondering if you have weaved a heart yet? I would love to try it and I haven’t found any “how to”s for weaving this shape.

    • Reply
      Kate
      March 29, 2017 at 5:29 pm

      Thanks for your kind words! I actually haven’t woven a heart shape before, that sounds like a fun thing to try. I’ll have to add it to my list.

  • Reply
    julie
    March 24, 2017 at 12:11 pm

    Hi Kate. I refer to your blog lots. It’s great. I just started weaving recently, but being a bored seasoned knitter with tons of yarn I am having a blast with lap loom free style tapestry weaving. One thing I keep wondering about when I finish a project and which I can’t seem to find answers for on the www is:
    Do you ‘block’ (term for soaking and drying your knit project once finished) your tapestry?
    In knitting it is done so that the yarn ‘blooms’ and the stitches develop completely. Is this something done by weavers particularly with tapestry. I would really appreciate if you could share your thoughts on that topic. Thank you!

    • Reply
      Kate
      March 29, 2017 at 6:36 pm

      Hi great question! I actually have blocked a weave when it wasn’t laying nicely (http://www.theweavingloom.com/weaving-issues-how-to-relax-a-wavy-weave/). I don’t do this with every weave, so I think it depends on what you’re most comfortable with, but it’s definitely something that can make your weave look nicer. I hope that helped 🙂

  • Reply
    Teresa
    April 17, 2017 at 3:01 am

    Hi Kate, your blog is lovely, inspiring . and full of useful tutorials. I made my first weaving following a pdf pattern I downloaded from your blog and it was great.

    • Reply
      Kate
      April 24, 2017 at 2:44 pm

      Yay! I’m so happy you liked the pattern.

  • Reply
    Allison
    April 26, 2017 at 10:05 pm

    Thanks for all of this info, and for organizing everything so beautifully! Because of you, I am ready to embark on my first non-cardboard weaving experiment!
    Cheers,
    Allison

    • Reply
      Kate
      May 2, 2017 at 4:33 pm

      Yay! That sounds exciting, keep me posted.

  • Reply
    Cheryl Jones
    May 6, 2017 at 10:53 am

    On Pininterest there are several pics showing what looks like horizontal warps (not on a pin loom). What are they?

    • Reply
      Kate
      May 9, 2017 at 10:00 am

      I’m not sure, do you have a link to what you’re talking about?

  • Reply
    Kitt Kroeger
    May 9, 2017 at 11:32 am

    Hi, I’m somewhat new to weaving; I’ve done a bit of it in the past. I know of a really cool dream-catcher-esque “wishmaker” (that’s what it’s called) from a movie. I saw someone who had actually made it, and it was so cool! I was hoping you could give me some advice, or point me in the right direction to go to make it as well, like the kind of techniques the girl who had made this already used, or what could be used. It’d be so fun to make this! I’ll link some pictures for you.
    I hope I’m not asking a lot from you or burdening you! I’m sorry if there’s a better way to contact you about this, I couldn’t find another way and I’m not sure if the email address on your page is correct or not.

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/C4NgpPJVUAABKuU.jpg
    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/C62lTTtU4AAa8HW.jpg
    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/C3Rl69IUoAA-W9A.jpg

    I hope this is enough, and that I’m not asking too much! If I am, just say so!

    Thank You,

    Kitt 🙂

    • Reply
      Kate
      May 9, 2017 at 6:09 pm

      Hi Kitt, that is a really cool wishmaker. Unfortunately it’s not something I’ve ever really made before. I would suggest searching for dream catcher instructions on pinterest, although there is more to it then a dream catcher, but that might help you get started.

      Have a great day!
      Kate

      • Reply
        Kitt Kroeger
        May 11, 2017 at 5:55 pm

        I’ve tried finding stuff on dream catchers, but it hasn’t been super helpful. My main question was how I would go about with that center knot. Most dream catchers have an open middle. Do you know any other weaving blogs that might be able to help?

        • Reply
          Kate
          May 18, 2017 at 3:30 pm

          You’re right that middle is very different then a dream catcher. I almost think they wrapped the middle, but I have no idea what they did before that. I wish I had somewhere helpful to point you, but I don’t know of anything similar. I did make a post on how to warp an embroidery hoop (http://www.theweavingloom.com/weaving-lessons-how-to-use-an-embroidery-hoop-as-a-loom/). It isn’t similar to what you’re looking for, but maybe it might help spark an idea. I hope you find what you’re looking for, it is a really pretty piece.

  • Reply
    Kristen
    May 10, 2017 at 6:23 am

    I have a question about the Herringbone stitch. Do you ever reverse your 8 steps? You have to if you want a diamond shape correct? Because if I continue to follow the 8 steps, I’ll just get zigzags?

  • Reply
    Jeff Cannon
    May 10, 2017 at 8:16 am

    Kate – Wonderful blog. I teach meditation and have been teaching people how to weave traditional meditation techniques together for years to create the tapestry we call Modern Meditation. I am just now learning how to weave more earthly fibers together to create more terrestrial tapestries. I have just taken up weaving and have fallen in love with the idea of incorporating found objects into my weavings. If you have any advice on weaving things like fathers, twigs, etc. into more monochromatic pieces I would love to hear it? Also, any advice on lap looms?

    Be well and thank you again for your inspirations and teachings. Such a wonderful, wonderful blog and practice.

    Jeff
    http://www.simple-truth.com

    • Reply
      Kate
      May 18, 2017 at 3:38 pm

      Thanks Jeff, weaving & meditation sound like a perfect pair. I guess my best advice for incorporating found objects is to be flexible. It helps if the object is similar to thread, so sticks or feathers would work really well. You’ll want to weave them as if they are thread, but also let them guide you to how they will look best (if that makes sense). I’m finding it hard to put this into words, but I’m just trying to say the different objects will have their limits and won’t be as flexible as thread. Also if you jam them in then they won’t look as good as they could. I did weave on a stick, which I posted about here http://www.theweavingloom.com/weave-experiments-stick-weaving/
      But I’m using it as a loom instead of incorporating it into a weave.

      I hope this helps!

  • Reply
    Jo Anna Tobey
    May 27, 2017 at 12:08 pm

    I subscribed yesterday, and got the offer to have a beginner’s pattern. But every time I enter my password, and hit enter, it “gobbles up” the password and the page remains empty.

    • Reply
      Kate
      June 9, 2017 at 5:57 pm

      I just emailed you with the solution!

  • Reply
    Karen
    June 12, 2017 at 12:58 am

    Thank you! Thank you! Thank you! I want a loopy rug for the bathroom and I think Rya loops are just the thing.

    Karen – weaver, knitter, spinner, crocheter, Yarn and fiber dyer, llama owner, mother, and so much more!

    • Reply
      Kate
      June 14, 2017 at 9:02 pm

      Yay Karen! I’m so happy when things work out. Let me know how your rug turns out.

  • Reply
    Jo
    July 29, 2017 at 10:20 am

    Hi Kate
    About to jump feet first into the weaving realm, so glad I found your blog, just waiting for my password and I will be off and running, with your blog open on the iPad close by.
    Cheers
    Jo

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