Draft Patterns Weaving Techniques

Weaving Techniques || Herringbone Weave

Herringbone Weave | The Weaving LoomI’ve been really loving how draft patterns are looking in my weaves. They are really easy to weave too once you get the pattern down. Today I am sharing the classic Herringbone weave. You’ve seen this pattern many times before. It makes the shape of diagonals, similar to a twill weave. However, where the twill continues in diagonals going the same direction, the Herringbone will stop and then have an offset of diagonals going in the opposite direction. It’s a really nice interlocking pattern.

Herringbone Weave | The Weaving LoomFor my example I’m weaving across 16 warp threads, but this will work over more or less warps. Here is my grid that I followed to weave. The white squares represent the warp threads, which means I will pass my weft threads under the warp. The black squares represent my weft thread, which means I will pass my weft over the warp. I’m also weaving in my usual upside down approach, which just means I face what will be the top of my weave towards me when weaving. So how you’re looking at the grid now, I’m starting in the top left corner.

step 1| pass the weft under 2 warp threads, then over 2, under 1, over 1. Now I repeat the pattern until I hit my 16th warp thread (ending on over 2 warp threads).

step 2| weaving in the opposite direction, I start with 1 under, 2 over, 2 under, repeating 2 over/2 under until I hit my 16th warp thread (ending on 1 under).

step 3| pass the weft 2 over, 2 under, over 1, under 1, repeating until I hit my 16th warp thread (ending 2 warp threads under).

step 4| 1 over, 2 under, 2 over, repeating 2 under/2 over until I hit my 16th warp thread (ending 1 over).

Herringbone Weave | The Weaving Loomstep 5| here the pattern is a repeat of step 1; under 2 warp threads, then over 2, under 1, over 1. Now I repeat the pattern until I hit my 16th warp thread (ending on over 2 warp threads).

step 6| repeating step 2; 1 under, 2 over, 2 under, repeating 2 over/2 under until I hit my 16th warp thread (ending on 1 under).

step 7| repeating step 3; 2 over, 2 under, over 1, under 1, repeating until I hit my 16th warp thread (ending 2 warp threads under).

step 8| repeating step 4; 1 over, 2 under, 2 over, repeating 2 under/2 over until I hit my 16th warp thread (ending 1 over).

Herringbone Weave | The Weaving LoomIt’s a fairly simple pattern, but the offset is where you have to pay attention. Still it’s easier then the double-diamond pattern that I shared before.

I was asked by some readers to share more video tutorials, so I’m working on putting together a tutorial on this pattern. You can find the videos I’ve made so far here, and I plan to go back and make videos on other techniques I have previously covered. If there is a technique that you would like to see a video on, let me know in the comments below.

What do you think of the Herringbone pattern? I really like how the diagonals interlock, it adds a bit more interest.

The Weaving Loom blog for weaversI’ve added some links at the top of the blog to make it more convenient for all you great readers (whoop-whoop!!). There is a link to my shop, so you can treat yourself to something pretty. A quick link resource page that contains all my weaving technique posts. And last, but not least, a link to all the video tutorials I have made. I hope you enjoy!

Happy Weaving!

Kate

 

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4 Comments

  • Reply
    Sam
    February 23, 2016 at 5:43 pm

    I can’t help but notice that this pattern would be much easier if you rotated it 90 degrees (switching which strings are fixed to the loom and which are being woven in. Then you would always be weaving over two, under two, over two, under two repeatedly, you would just need to stagger your starting point in that pattern.
    Does that make any sense? I don’t know much about weaving so I probably got all the words wrong… Anyways, I hope that wasn’t a totally stupid observation.

    • Reply
      Kate
      February 24, 2016 at 2:49 pm

      Hi Sam, I love when people look at things in a different way, that is how you make new discoveries. You’re partially right, you could turn your loom sideways so that the warp threads (the fixed threads) are horizontal and then weave that way. The only issue with the Herringbone weave is it isn’t over two under two always. When you hit the area that the pattern disjoints, you weave over one under one, otherwise you have a great idea that might help others weave easier.

      • Reply
        Sam
        February 25, 2016 at 1:46 pm

        Sorry, I think I was unclear. I had meant that rotating the pattern itself, not the loom. The herringbone pattern disjoints within the rows, but if you follow any given column down you will see it is over two under two every time, the only exception being where you begin that pattern at the top of the column (because it’s staggered). By rotating the pattern so that what is now the weft becomes the warp, then you only need to weave the weft in a consistent over two under two pattern with a staggered start.
        Of course, this would cause the “arrows” of the herringbone pattern to point sideways rather than vertical. Depending on the desired effect, this could not be for you 😛
        I just thought it might be an easier introduction to the herringbone stitch for someone like me just starting out (and mostly because I hate having to look at a pattern while I’m working, so the more I can make it a no-brainer the better!).
        Thanks for your reply, I hope I made more sense this time! I’m still figuring out the wording and stuff, so your patience is much appreciated 🙂

        • Reply
          Kate
          February 25, 2016 at 4:28 pm

          Oh haha, now I understand. Sorry, I didn’t get it the first time. Yeah you could weave the pattern the other way and if it’s easier then even better! Thanks for your comment 🙂

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