Weaving Lessons Weaving Techniques

Finishing Your Weaves

Finish your Weaves with these techniques!I’ve made quite a few posts on how to finish a weave and take it off the loom, but I still get questions.  Today I’m pulling together my posts so that they are easier to find.  And maybe there is a technique you haven’t seen yet.

Finishing a Weave

Finish your Weaves with these techniques!The first step to finishing a weave is what to do with all those end tails hanging out the back of your weave. For regular weight threads, I’ll tuck the end tails into the back of the same color. You can read more about it here.

Finish your Weaves with these techniques!For really thick fiber, like roving, or if I wove with multiple threads at once I’ll tuck the end tails in the back under the exposed warp threads. You can read more about it here.

Taking a Weave off the Loom

Depending on what type of loom you’re using and how you want to hang your weave, there are different ways to do this.

Finish your Weaves with these techniques!One way I really like to finish my weaves is to do the hem stitch at the top and the bottom of the weave. This makes a really nice edge and will ensure that your weft threads won’t creep up your warp. You can read more about it here.

Whether you choose to do the hem stitch or not, here are some ways to hang your weave:

1|| Cutting your weave from the loom

Finish your Weaves with these techniques!option 1| double knot the warp threads together and tuck them in the back, then attach the weave to a dowel rod with a new string. Read more on that here.

Finish your Weaves with these techniques!option 2| tie off the warp threads, then use the warp threads to hang the weave from the dowel rod. Read more on that here.

2|| Use warp loops to hang your weave

Finish your Weaves with these techniques!option 1| twist the warp loops to keep the weft in place, then hang on dowel rod. Read more here.

Finish your Weaves with these techniques!option 2| tie the warp loops to keep the weft in place, then hang on the dowel rod. Read more here.

And if your weave has attitude (wink) once it’s off the loom, then I have two posts that might help. Here’s how I fixed a weave that was wavy due to weft spacing and here is how I used a blocking technique to make a weave flatter.

There are so many ways to finish weaves. If you use a technique that’s different then what I mentioned, I’d love to hear about it.

Happy Weaving!

Kate

For more fun, follow me here -> pinterestinstagram

You Might Also Like

3 Comments

  • Reply
    Jennifer
    November 22, 2016 at 5:47 am

    Hi! I am new to weaving (I started at the end of the Summer after seeing some amazing weaves in Joshua Tree) and now I am HOOKED. I was wondering what you use for your warp string? It looks so lovely and tidy! I tend to use a white wool but it starts getting hairy as the weave progresses, if you know what I mean. Many thanks in advance! xxxx

  • Reply
    Jennifer
    November 22, 2016 at 5:52 am

    Me again! I found your “in my weaving bag” post – thanks so much for all of your trips and advice… I am ready to roll! x

    • Reply
      Kate
      November 29, 2016 at 3:25 pm

      Great! Yes I love the cotton warp because it’s sturdier and doesn’t fuzz like wool does.

    Leave a Reply